Saturday, September 20, 2014
Lesser bushbaby, from David Haring.


In a series of leaps, a bush baby can easily cover 10 yards in seconds. The tail (longer than the length of the head and body) powers the leaps made to catch prey, escape from enemies, or get around obstacles. The bush baby’s other methods of locomotion are kangaroo-like hops or simply walking or running on four legs. They frequently mark their routes with urine. By following their own scent, they can jump onto exactly the same branches each time when they go to or from their nest. Males also urine-mark the boundaries of their territories and will sometimes become aggressive toward intruders.

Lesser bushbaby, from David Haring.

In a series of leaps, a bush baby can easily cover 10 yards in seconds. The tail (longer than the length of the head and body) powers the leaps made to catch prey, escape from enemies, or get around obstacles. The bush baby’s other methods of locomotion are kangaroo-like hops or simply walking or running on four legs. They frequently mark their routes with urine. By following their own scent, they can jump onto exactly the same branches each time when they go to or from their nest. Males also urine-mark the boundaries of their territories and will sometimes become aggressive toward intruders.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014
Red-faced black spider monkey, from animalphotos.me.


Like other species of spider monkeys, black spider monkeys occupy the upper layers of the rainforest and forage in the high canopy (from 25 to 30 m [82.0 to 98.4 ft]). As large-bodied frugivores, black spider monkeys are important seed dispersers within the rainforest ecosystem and play a crucial role in regenerating tropical forests…Despite their dependence on fruit as the mainstay of their diet, black spider monkeys supplement their fruit consumption during periods of scarcity with other food items including flowers, leaves, roots, bulbs, bark and decaying wood, and honey.

Red-faced black spider monkey, from animalphotos.me.

Like other species of spider monkeys, black spider monkeys occupy the upper layers of the rainforest and forage in the high canopy (from 25 to 30 m [82.0 to 98.4 ft]). As large-bodied frugivores, black spider monkeys are important seed dispersers within the rainforest ecosystem and play a crucial role in regenerating tropical forests…Despite their dependence on fruit as the mainstay of their diet, black spider monkeys supplement their fruit consumption during periods of scarcity with other food items including flowers, leaves, roots, bulbs, bark and decaying wood, and honey.

Sunday, June 15, 2014
Happy Father’s Day! Here’s a white cheeked gibbon family, from Julie Larsen Maher.


Gibbons are unique in that infants are born with blonde fur like their mother, but by age 2 their color turns to black.  When they reach adulthood, males remain black and females change back to blonde.

Happy Father’s Day! Here’s a white cheeked gibbon family, from Julie Larsen Maher.

Gibbons are unique in that infants are born with blonde fur like their mother, but by age 2 their color turns to black.  When they reach adulthood, males remain black and females change back to blonde.

Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Sun-tailed monkey, from arkive.org:


The sun-tailed monkey has a polygynous mating system, and adult males will actively defend their groups from other males trying to usurp them. Whilst males disperse from their natal group, females remain, and a dominance hierarchy exists amongst these females, which is subsequently inherited by their offspring.

Sun-tailed monkey, from arkive.org:

The sun-tailed monkey has a polygynous mating system, and adult males will actively defend their groups from other males trying to usurp them. Whilst males disperse from their natal group, females remain, and a dominance hierarchy exists amongst these females, which is subsequently inherited by their offspring.

Monday, May 5, 2014
Fat-tailed dwarf lemurs, from the Duke Lemur Center:


The fat-tailed dwarf lemur hibernates in holes of trees along the western coast of Madagascar for up to seven months each year. Like all hibernating animals, this primate uses hibernation as an opportunity to conserve energy during a period when the fruits and leaves it usually feeds on are not readily available. During this time, the animal’s metabolic activity decreases to about 2 percent of what it would be if it were active, and its body temperature drops to match the ambient temperature, which can drop to as low as 41 degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius) during certain times of the year, but generally hovers around 59 F (15 C). When the lemur is awake, its body temperature boosts back up to around 98 F (37 C).

Fat-tailed dwarf lemurs, from the Duke Lemur Center:

The fat-tailed dwarf lemur hibernates in holes of trees along the western coast of Madagascar for up to seven months each year. Like all hibernating animals, this primate uses hibernation as an opportunity to conserve energy during a period when the fruits and leaves it usually feeds on are not readily available. During this time, the animal’s metabolic activity decreases to about 2 percent of what it would be if it were active, and its body temperature drops to match the ambient temperature, which can drop to as low as 41 degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius) during certain times of the year, but generally hovers around 59 F (15 C). When the lemur is awake, its body temperature boosts back up to around 98 F (37 C).

Saturday, April 19, 2014
White-thighed surili monkeys, from arkive.org:

 
Like other Presbytis species, the white-thighed surili (Presbytis siamensis) is a medium-sized, slenderly built monkey with a long tail, a short muzzle and relatively long fur. The top of its head and its back tend to be a dark greyish-brown, while the underside of the body, including the undersides of the tail, legs and arms, tends to be a lighter pale grey to white. There is also a large whitish patch on the outside of the legs, from which the white-thighed surili gets its name.

White-thighed surili monkeys, from arkive.org:

Like other Presbytis species, the white-thighed surili (Presbytis siamensis) is a medium-sized, slenderly built monkey with a long tail, a short muzzle and relatively long fur. The top of its head and its back tend to be a dark greyish-brown, while the underside of the body, including the undersides of the tail, legs and arms, tends to be a lighter pale grey to white. There is also a large whitish patch on the outside of the legs, from which the white-thighed surili gets its name.

Sunday, April 6, 2014
Patas monkey, from Jiri Bohdal.


The patas monkey is the most terrestrial (ground-dwelling) and fastest of all primates, running at speeds of up to 35 miles per hour. Although the patas will climb trees when alarmed, it spends most of its time on the ground. An exception to the rule of big, aggressive Old World Monkeys, the patas will run away rather than fight.

Patas monkey, from Jiri Bohdal.

The patas monkey is the most terrestrial (ground-dwelling) and fastest of all primates, running at speeds of up to 35 miles per hour. Although the patas will climb trees when alarmed, it spends most of its time on the ground. An exception to the rule of big, aggressive Old World Monkeys, the patas will run away rather than fight.

Saturday, March 22, 2014
A siamang showing off its throat sac, from arkive.org:


In the early hours of the morning, the powerful song of the siamang fills the forest. This singing, which can be heard up to around two kilometres away, includes duets by the adult male and female, and functions to establish and maintain pair bonds, and to advertise their presence and territory. These vocalisations have been known to continue for around fifteen minutes, and are much louder than those of other gibbon species.

A siamang showing off its throat sac, from arkive.org:

In the early hours of the morning, the powerful song of the siamang fills the forest. This singing, which can be heard up to around two kilometres away, includes duets by the adult male and female, and functions to establish and maintain pair bonds, and to advertise their presence and territory. These vocalisations have been known to continue for around fifteen minutes, and are much louder than those of other gibbon species.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Javan lutung and baby, from chasnam.


This langur lives in social groups of around seven individuals, with one or two adult males in the group. Adult Javan langur females are aggressive towards females from other groups, and have been observed looking after the offspring of other mothers, as well as their own. It is thought that juveniles are brightly coloured because this alerts females to their presence and ensures that they will always be noticed and protected.

Javan lutung and baby, from chasnam.

This langur lives in social groups of around seven individuals, with one or two adult males in the group. Adult Javan langur females are aggressive towards females from other groups, and have been observed looking after the offspring of other mothers, as well as their own. It is thought that juveniles are brightly coloured because this alerts females to their presence and ensures that they will always be noticed and protected.

Saturday, March 1, 2014
Sunda or greater slow loris, from primatology.net.

Unlike many other primates, all species of loris only have a vestigial tail and instead use incredibly mobile wrist and ankle joints to manoeuvre along branches. Opposable thumbs and an extensive network of narrow blood vessels in its limbs enable an effortless and powerful grasp, allowing the greater slow loris to tightly grip branches for hours at a time.

Sunda or greater slow loris, from primatology.net.

Unlike many other primates, all species of loris only have a vestigial tail and instead use incredibly mobile wrist and ankle joints to manoeuvre along branches. Opposable thumbs and an extensive network of narrow blood vessels in its limbs enable an effortless and powerful grasp, allowing the greater slow loris to tightly grip branches for hours at a time.